Law Enforcement Technology

JUN 2019

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Officer.com JUNE/JULY 2019 LAW ENFORCEMENT TECHNOLOGY 33 © 2019 by MacNeil IP LLC 800-943-9250 American Customers WeatherTech.com Canadian Customers WeatherTech.ca European Customers WeatherTech.eu FloorLiner ™ Cargo/Trunk Liner CarCoasters ® Cargo/Trunk Liner BumpStep ® XL Request information at Officer.com/10029566 agencies can make it more cost effective. "We've seen agencies share tower sites and connectivities and have great success in doing that," Melcer says. There are a number of challenges, a major one is time. "It's frowned upon that it takes three years to put some- thing in," says Moran. "If you're starting from scratch, you have to put things in place, do your due diligence on what you're missing and how far you need to dig in." Chris Kelly, VP, Director of Wireless Services, MCP agrees, "These tend to be long projects. You might spend a year putting the requirements together, finding funding and going through the procurement. You might imple- ment for two to three years. Whenever we're digging up the issues, it's hard for users to grasp it might be three years down the road. Usually a 911 Director is in charge, but they have their day job making sure everything is up and running. One reason they hire consultants is because they don't have time to devote to a project like this." Utilizing a consultant, such as MCP helps agencies leap this hurdle. "Our main clients, the small counties, don't have the time," Kelly states. "We're there to be staff augmentation, to be the project manager and the subject experts, to make sure what the county signed up for they are getting." The future of radio Moran sees infrastructure changing including satel- lite replacing big radio antennas. Melcer believes there will be more partnerships, too. Due to the expense and the time involved, radio system overhauls need to be carefully constructed with an eye towards the future. Stakeholders from government managers to line staff need to be involved and have a say in the design and implementation. Additionally, businesses assisting agen- cies in the upgrades need to be focused on what matters most: citizen and first responder safety. Inside the Anne Arundel County (Md.) Police Department Communications Center.

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